Common Foot Conditions

Warts

Warts
Warts are the most common infection of the skin caused by a virus. Plantar warts grow on the plantar, or bottom surface of the foot. They tend to be found in areas of pressure such as the heel and ball of the foot. Plantar warts often grow into the deeper layers of skin because of the pressure they receive because of their location.

 

Corns & CallusesCorns & Calluses
A corn is a thickening of the skin due to pressure. usually on the top of the toes where there is pressure from the shoes. However, they also occur on the sole of the foot and between toes. Certain corns may become entwined with the nerves of the skin, these corns are particularly painful. Often corns develop a core which is often referred to as the “root” by patients. Corns can be very painful, especially if there is inflammation and swelling around the corn.

 

Ingrown ToenailsIngrown Toenails
In growing toe nails are one of the most common foot complaints treated by a chiropodist. This condition can be very painful and patients may often be very reluctant to have the condition treated. However, we can assure you that this condition will not resolve itself and requires specialist care. An In growing toe nail is caused by a splinter of nail or the whole nail breaking through the skin. The large toe is usually affected, however, it can also affect the lesser toes.

Plantar Fasciitis

 

Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar Fasciitis (which can lead to heel spurs) is a persistent pain located on the bottom of the heel, usually worse in the morning. The plantar fascia is a fibrous, tendon-like structure that extends the entire length of the bottom of the foot. During excessive activity, the plantar fascia can become irritated, inflamed and even tear. Improper footwear with inadequate support can lead to the injury.

 

Athlete's Foot and Fungal NailsAthlete’s Foot and Fungal Nails
Athlete’s foot is a skin disease caused by a fungus, usually occurring between the toes. The fungus attacks the feet because shoes create a warm, dark, and humid environment which encourages fungus growth in the skin and nails. Not all skin and nail conditions are athlete’s foot. Other conditions, such as disturbances of the sweat mechanism, reaction to dyes or adhesives in shoes, eczema, and psoriasis, may mimic athlete’s foot.